Time – Archive Z
Time

Click on any navigational rose for a search tool that will lead you to individual images.

More on how the Tibetan and Gregorian calendars relate

Click on any navigational rose for a search tool that takes you to individual images.

More on how the Tibetan and Gregorian calendars relate

Click on any navigational rose for a search tool that takes you to individual images.

More on how the Tibetan and Gregorian calendars relate

Click on the navigational rose for a search tool that takes you to individual images.

More on how the Tibetan and Gregorian calendars relate

Click on the navigational rose for a search tool that takes you to individual images.

More on how the Tibetan and Gregorian calendars relate

Click on any navigational rose for a search tool that takes you to individual images.

This rose explains how the thirty days of the Tibetan month relate to a lunar month, which is technically only 29.5 days long. Note that the Tibetan month new moon usually falls on the 30th day and full moon on the 15th day, while the moon is waxing from day 1 through day 14 and waning from day 16 through day 29. If the moon does not advance by 12 degrees on a given solar day, the Tibetan lunar calendar marks the same day twice, and if the moon advances through two 12-degree quadrants in a solar day, the Tibetan lunar calendar skips a day. Hence, any given Tibetan month may have one or more repeated days and skipped days to assure that the full moon always falls near the 15th and the new moon on the 30th (or 29th if the 30th is skipped).

More on how the Tibetan and Gregorian calendars relate

Click on the navigational rose for a search tool that takes you to individual images.

This rose shows the rough divisions of time in a single day used in rural Ladakh, where some people do not have regular access to wristwatches or clocks.

More on how the Tibetan and Gregorian calendars relate

Click on the navigational rose for a search tool that takes you to individual images.